Now accepting Telehealth appointments. Contact us to schedule a virtual visit.

Psoriasis

What is Psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a skin condition that speeds up the life cycle of skin cells. Psoriasis sufferers often have red patches of skin, scaly spots, dry and cracked skin, and itching and burning. Psoriasis suffers can also experience swollen and stiff joints.. Here are some types of psoriasis: • Plaque psoriasis: The most common type, appearing as patched raised, reddish skin. Patches can occur anywhere on the skin. • Pustular psoriasis: White pustules will surround red skin, located around the palms and soles. • Inverse psoriasis: Red lesions form where skin folds (under the armpit, breasts, around the groin, buttocks, and genital area). • Erythrodermic psoriasis: Can cause widespread severe itching and pain accompanied by red skin. Can be life threatening if not treated. While there is no cure for psoriasis our experienced and caring team of dermatologists and clinicians can create a treatment plan to help ease the suffering of psoriasis. Make your appointment today.

You Might Also Enjoy...

Which Type of Chemical Peel Is Right for You?

Chemical peels can drive dramatic transformation in your skin, but different peels function in a variety of ways. To help you determine the best option for yourself, here are four areas to consider.

Will Cysts on My Scalp Go Away on Their Own?

If you have a cyst on your scalp — whether it’s a pilar cyst or another type of growth — you’re probably wondering what to do. Learn when scalp cysts may go away on their own and, if they don’t, what we can do about them.

5 Common Eczema Triggers

If you have a rash that just won’t go away, it could be eczema. Learn what triggers this bothersome skin condition.

Living With Psoriasis

The right care can make a huge difference in your comfort level as you live with psoriasis. Learn your options for getting your healthiest skin — and best life — here.

How to Prevent a Rosacea Flare-Up

Rosacea is probably an unwelcome part of your life, but you can take steps to minimize its role. Here are a few actionable ways to prevent a flare-up.